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Dry eye

Dry eye known medically as keratoconjunctivitis sicca or keratitis sicca, is a condition where there is a problem with the production of tears.

  • Usually eyes feel irritated, scratchy, dry and uncomfortable. Eyes may be red and there may be a burning sensation, or it may feel as if there is something in the eye like grit or an eyelash. Sometimes there may be periods of blurred vision but these normally go away after a short while or on blinking. Sometimes eyes may water too much and often eyes won’t actually feel dry but you may notice that there are no tears when you are upset or when peeling onions.

    Why do my eyes feel this way?
    Tears are important as they form a layer on the very front of the eye. Called the tear film, this layer does a number of things. The tear film takes a part in the focusing of light into the eye but it mainly lubricates the eye keeping it moist and smooth. The tear film is actually made up of three layers each with a different function.

    The layer closest to the eye is called the mucin layer. It coats the cornea which is the clear window at the front of the eye; it forms a foundation for the other layers of the tear film.

    The middle layer is called the aqueous layer. This is the watery layer that most people think of when they think of tears. This layer is produced by the lacrimal gland which is underneath the upper eyelid. This layer provides moisture and supplies oxygen and other important nutrients to the cornea. This layer is mainly water.

    The outer layer is called the lipid layer. This is an oily film which seals the tear film to the eye and helps to prevent any evaporation. Evaporation is the technical name for the watery layer being lost into the air.

    The mucin and lipid layers are produced by small glands around the eye. Each time we blink the tears are spread onto the front of the eye. Excess tears are drained away by tiny drainage holes on the inside of the eyelids, these holes channel the excess tears into the nose. This is why crying sometimes makes your nose run.

  • Dry eye has a number of causes. It happens mostly as a part of the natural ageing process but can also be caused by problems with blinking or problems with the glands which produce the tears. Some drugs can cause dry eye, like antihistamines and oral contraceptives. Contact lenses carry an increased risk if you have dry eye.

    Sometimes dry eye is also a symptom of other conditions affecting other parts of the body particularly arthritis or a condition called Sjogrens syndrome. Sjogrens syndrome is a condition where, as well as dry eyes, people can also have a dry mouth and a dry vagina. This condition can also involve a type of arthritis.

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Dry eye consultants

A picture of Professor Mariya Moosajee

Professor Mariya Moosajee


Consultant Ophthalmologist

A picture of Mr David Verity

Mr David Verity


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Mr Ranjan Rajendram


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Miss Claire Daniel


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Mr Bishwanath Pal


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Ms Laura de Benito-Llopis

Ms Laura de Benito-Llopis


Consultant Ophthalmologist

A picture of Mr Aires Lobo

Mr Aires Lobo


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Rajesh Deshmukh

Mr Rajesh Deshmukh


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Dr Hari Jayaram

Dr Hari Jayaram


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Professor Adnan Tufail

Professor Adnan Tufail


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Martin Watson

Mr Martin Watson


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Sajjad Ahmad

Mr Sajjad Ahmad


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Parham Azarbod

Mr Parham Azarbod


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Miss Branka Marjanovic

Miss Branka Marjanovic


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Miss Sharmina  Khan

Miss Sharmina Khan


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Praveen Patel

Mr Praveen Patel


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Mr Anthony Khawaja


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Mr Raj Das-Bhaumik


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Mr George Voyatzis


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Miss Poornima Rai


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Mr Kamran Saha


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Miss Dhanes Thomas


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Mr Jaheed Khan


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Professor Michel Michaelides


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Romil Patel

Mr Romil Patel


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Miss Dilani Siriwardena

Miss Dilani Siriwardena


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Mr John Brookes


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Mr Amanjeet Sandhu


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Mr Saab Bhermi


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Niaz Islam

Mr Niaz Islam


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Badrul Hussain

Mr Badrul Hussain


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr George Saleh

Mr George Saleh


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Ms Pari Shams

Ms Pari Shams


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Anant Sharma

Mr Anant Sharma


Consultant ophthalmic surgeon (private practice in Bedford only)

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Paying for treatment

Private Medical Insurance

If you are covered by private medical insurance, please verify the details with your insurer prior to arrival and if possible, obtain a pre-authorisation number.

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Self pay

You don’t have to be insured to come to Moorfields Private. Many of our patients pay for their own treatment.

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Interest free payment plans

We offer payment plans via a 3rd party provider for the majority of cases within the following procedures:

You are able to apply for interest free payment plans over six, nine and ten months, subject to a credit check, no deposit is required.

For more information please speak to your consultant’s practice manager prior to your consultation.

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Third party sponsorship

​If a company, employer or other third party agrees to settle your account, they will be required to provide a letter of guarantee along with a deposit.

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