Eye conditions & treatments

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The macula is a small, but extremely important area located at the centre of the retina, the light-sensing tissue that lines the back of the eye. It is responsible for seeing fine details clearly.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) involves damage to the macula and affects central vision.

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Blepharitis is inflammation of the rims of the eyelids, which causes them to become red and swollen.

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A cataract is clouding or opacity of the lens inside the eye. It causes gradual blurring of vision and often glare.

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A chalazion is a common condition affecting your eyelids. The condition often occurs due to inflammation around the opening of the oil glands at the base of your eyelashes. This is called blepharitis.

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Children will be seen by a Moorfields Private consultant paediatric ophthalmologist. Initial appointments for children can take 60-90 minutes. Common problems affecting children include Lazy Eye (Amblyopia), squints (Strabismus), and Watery Eye (Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction).

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Conjunctivitis is a common condition which causes the surface of your eye to go red and, often, sticky or watery and your eye becomes sore.

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Corneal abrasions are a small scratch on the cornea, the clear window at the front of the eye. They are generally a result of trauma (injury) to the surface of the eye. Common causes include a fingernail scratching the eye, walking into something, and getting grit in the eye, particularly if the eye is then rubbed. Injuries can also be caused by contact lens insertion and removal.

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When patients have been told that they need a corneal graft they often feel worried about what this involves. This section will give you more information on what a corneal graft is and what the grafting procedure involves.

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Diabetic eye disease is a leading cause of blindness registration among working age adults in England and Wales. It is caused by changes to the tiny blood vessels of the retina (the light sensitive layer at the back of the eye). In diabetic macular oedema, blood vessels leak fluid into the retina.

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Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes, and causes damage to the blood vessels in the retina.

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A low upper lid can interfere with vision by affecting the top part of your visual field You might also have difficulty keeping your eyelids open, eyestrain or eyebrow ache (from the increased effort needed to raise your eyelids), and fatigue, especially when reading. For some patients, ptosis poses a cosmetic problem.

Ptosis can either be present at birth (congenital), or appears later in life (acquired), following long-term contact lens wear, trauma, after cataract surgery or other eye operations. There are less common causes of a droopy eyelid, such as problems with the nerves or muscles.

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Dry eye known medically as keratoconjunctivitis sicca or keratitis sicca, is a condition where there is a problem with the production of tears.

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Endophthalmitis is an inflammation of the internal eye tissues.

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An epiretinal membrane is a thin sheet of fibrous tissue that develops on the surface of the macula and can cause problems with central vision.

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Episcleritis is a common condition affecting the episclera, the layer of tissue between the surface membrane (conjunctiva) and the firm white part of the eye (the sclera). In episcleritis, the episclera becomes inflamed and red. It often causes irritation, soreness or a gritty sensation. Episcleritis can be recurrent.

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Squint is the common name for ‘strabismus’ which is the medical term used to describe eyes that are not pointing in the same direction. A squint can be convergent (esotropia), divergent (exotropia) or vertical.

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The brain normally combines the slightly different images from each to give a 3-D picture of the world. When a squint is present (strabismus) the eyes point in different directions and the brain is no longer able to do this.

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Floaters are shapes which people can see drifting across their vision. The exact form of these is very variable – they may appear as small dots or irregularly shaped strands.

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In Fuchs’ dystrophy, an inherited problem with the pump layer of cells (those responsible for pumping fluid back into the eye) lining the inner aspect of the cornea (the corneal endothelium), causes the cornea to become waterlogged and cloudy.

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Genetic eye disease is a leading cause of blindness among infants, children and adults. It represents the commonest cause of severe visual loss in children and the working age population in the UK.

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Moorfields Private is at the forefront of research into glaucoma, and we are always ready to help patients determine the best course of action when faced with this condition.

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Including Retinitis Pigmentosa and Stargardt Disease

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Keratoconus is an eye condition in which the normally round dome-shaped clear window of the eye (cornea) progressively thins causing a cone-shaped bulge to develop.

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Lazy eye (Amblyopia) develops in childhood and results in reduced vision in one eye. Amblyopia happens when one eye is used less than the other from birth to seven years of age, which leads the brain to prefer the better eye. Rarely, as a result of a strong glasses prescription, amblyopia may affect both eyes.

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A macular hole is a small hole in the macula which is in the centre of the retina.

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Neuro-ophthalmology consists of optic nerve problems (eg optic neuritis, optic neuropathy, optic atrophy), problems with the pupil (eg Horner syndrome, Adie pupil), cranial nerve palsies (third, fourth, sixth nerve palsies), nystagmus (wobbly eyes), visual problems and eye movement problems due to disease/damage to the brain (eg MS, stroke, trauma, intracranial hypertension), unexplained/functional/non-organic visual loss.

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An ocular melanoma is the most common type of eye tumour. It develops from cells called melanocytes, which are found in the uvea (the middle layer of tissue around the eyeball that includes the choroid, the ciliary body and the iris). Ocular melanomas usually affect one eye only.

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Retinal detachment occurs when the thin lining at the back of your eye begins to pull away from the blood vessels that supply it.

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A retinal vein occlusion occurs when a blockage forms in a retinal vein.

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A stye is a small abcess (painful collection of pus) on the eyelid and is an infection at the root of an eyelash. It appears as a small painful red lump, often with a yellow spot in the middle, on the outside of the eyelid. Other symptoms include a watery eye and a red eye or eyelid.

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Uveitis is inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, which is called the uvea (or uveal tract).

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The term “vitreoretinal” refers to any operation to treat eye problems involving the retina, macula, and vitreous fluid. These include retinal detachment, macular hole, epiretinal membrane and complications related to diabetic retinopathy.

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Watering eye is a condition where tears are produced without any obvious explanation. The medical name is epiphora.

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Eye conditions & treatments consultants

A picture of Mr Michael Miller

Mr Michael Miller


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Bishwanath Pal

Mr Bishwanath Pal


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr John Brookes

Mr John Brookes


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Eric Ezra

Mr Eric Ezra


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Miss Dhanes Thomas

Miss Dhanes Thomas


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Miss Winifred Nolan

Miss Winifred Nolan


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Julian Stevens

Mr Julian Stevens


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Mandeep Sagoo

Mr Mandeep Sagoo


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Saab Bhermi

Mr Saab Bhermi


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Miss Alison Davis

Miss Alison Davis


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Miss Gillian Adams

Miss Gillian Adams


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Raj Das-Bhaumik

Mr Raj Das-Bhaumik


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Professor David Garway-Heath

Professor David Garway-Heath


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Professor Lyndon Da Cruz

Professor Lyndon Da Cruz


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

A picture of Mr Richard Andrews

Mr Richard Andrews


Consultant Ophthalmic Surgeon

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Paying for treatment

Private Medical Insurance

If you are covered by Private Medical Insurance, please verify the details with your insurer prior to arrival and if possible, obtain a preauthorisation number.

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You don’t have to be insured to come to Moorfields Private. In fact many of our patients pay for their own treatment.

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